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Volume-7 Issue-4, April 2018, ISSN: 2249-8958 (Online)
Published By: Blue Eyes Intelligence Engineering & Sciences Publication Pvt. Ltd.

Page No.

1.

Authors:

Prabakar Parthiban

Paper Title:

Gain Uncertainty in Commercial UHF RFID Fixed Reader Antennas and Its Effect on Tag Read Accuracy

Abstract: Ultra High Frequency (UHF) Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is a type of RFID technology that is being widely used in recent days. The fixed UHF RFID readers use tuned antennas for far-field power transmission. The gain specified in the reader antennas’ datasheets are often not accurate and vary between manufacturers. This paper presents an experimental method to analyze the gain uncertainty through the path loss measurements. Four commercially available similar sized fixed UHF RFID reader antennas are chosen for this experimentation. The commercial antennas are also benchmarked using an RFID tag for its read rate, read count and the tag`s return signal strength. The impact on the gain uncertainty in RFID applications is also discussed. 

Keywords: UHF RFID; Far-Field; Antenna Gain; Uncertainty.

References:

  1. RFID Systems (2017, December). Jovix Enterprises [Online]. Available: http://rfid.atlasrfidstore.com/hs-fs/hub/300870/file-252314647-pdf/Content/basics-of-an-rfid-system-atlasrfidstore.pdf
  2. Speedway r420 RAIN RFID (2017, December). Impinj, Inc. [Online]. Available: https://www.impinj.com/platform/connectivity/speedway-r420/
  3. Astra EX - Rain RFID (2017, December). JADEK, LLC. [Online]. Available: http://www.thingmagic.com/index.php/integrated-readers/astra-ex
  4. T. Liao, Y. Y. Chen, Y. K. Wang and H. M. Chen, "Design of planar near-field RFID reader antenna for liquid tagging," 2017 IEEE International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation & USNC/URSI National Radio Science Meeting, San Diego, CA, 2017, pp. 2453-2454.
  5. Bohler, M. Daniol, and C. Wehrle, “Identification of instruments and implants with RFID and Data Matrix Codes for the use at the instrument table,” Przegląd elektrotechniczny, pp. 225-228, 2016.
  6. Paredes, I. Cairó, S. Zuffanelli, G. Zamora, J. Bonache and F. Martin, "Compact design of UHF RFID and NFC antennas for mobile phones," in IET Microwaves, Antennas & Propagation, vol. 11, no. 7, pp. 1016-1019, 2017.
  7. Tolin, A. Bahr, M. Geissler and F. Vipiana, "Flexible and cost effective reconfigurable UHF RFID antenna system," 2017 11th European Conference on Antennas and Propagation (EUCAP), Paris, 2017, pp. 2037-2040.
  8. Yang, N. Scirocco, M. Crisp, R. V. Penty and I. H. White, "Large Metal Objects As Near Field UHF RFID Antennas," in IEEE Journal of Radio Frequency Identification, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 13-21, 2017
  9. Rahmat-Samii, V. Manohar and J. M. Kovitz, "For Satellites, Think Small, Dream Big: A review of recent antenna developments for CubeSats.," in IEEE Antennas and Propagation Magazine, vol. 59, no. 2, pp. 22-30, 2017.
  10. Y. Lau, Chu Qingxin and Wu Yueshan, "Review on UHF RFID antennas," 2017 International Workshop on Electromagnetics: Applications and Student Innovation Competition, London, 2017, pp. 53-55.
  11. Blalock and J. A. Fordham, "Antenna measurement uncertainty method for measurements in compact antenna test ranges," 2016 10th European Conference on Antennas and Propagation (EuCAP), Davos, 2016, pp. 1-5.
  12. Eriksson, B. Svensson and P. Magnusson, "Gain calibration uncertainties for standard gain horn calibration at a compact antenna test range," Proceedings of the 5th European Conference on Antennas and Propagation (EUCAP), Rome, 2011, pp. 3746-3750.
  13. Lingasamy, K. T. Selvan, T. S. Bird and V. Venkatesan, "Uncertainty Estimation in the Two-Antenna Gain Measurement of a 4.8-11-GHz Double-Ridged Horn [Measurements Corner]," in IEEE Antennas and Propagation Magazine, vol. 59, no. 1, pp. 110-113, 2017.
  14. Li Zhang and D. Wang, "Gain measurement and uncertainty assessment of A GPS receiver's antenna At 1575.42MHz," 2012 IEEE International Conference on Vehicular Electronics and Safety (ICVES 2012), Istanbul, 2012, pp. 427-431.
  15. Alien A0501 Antenna Datasheet (2017, December). Atlas RFID Store. [Online]. Available: http://rfid.atlasrfidstore.com/ hubfs/1_Tech_Spec_Sheets/Alien/ATLAS%20Alien%20ALR-A0501%20Compact%20RFID%20Antenna.pdf
  16. Laird S9025PR Antenna Datasheet (2017, December). Laird Technologies. [Online]. Available: https://assets.lairdtech.com /home/brandworld/files/ANT-DS-S9025P-0317.pdf
  17. Laird PEL90206 Antenna Datasheet (2017, December). Laird Technologies. [Online]. Available: https://assets.lairdtech.com /home /brandworld/files/ANT-DS-PEL90206%200314.pdf
  18. Times-7 A5020 Antenna Datasheet (2017, December). Laird Technologies. [Online]. Available: http://www.times-7.com/assets/files/datasheets/Current%20Datasheets/A5020%20Datasheet_v1.6.pdf
  19. UHF Applications (2005, September). Texas Instruments [Online]. Available: http://read.pudn.com /downloads102/ebook/418037/TI_rfid-tutorial3.pdf
  20. Burgos, S. Pivnenko, O. Breinbjerg and M. Sierra-Castaner, "Comparative Investigation of Four Antenna Gain Determination Techniques," The Second European Conference on Antennas and Propagation, EuCAP 2007, Edinburgh, 2007, pp. 1-5.
  21. Breinbjerg, K. Kaslis and J. M. Nielsen, "An experimental and computational investigation of high-accuracy calibration techniques for gain reference antennas," 2017 Antenna Measurement Techniques Association Symposium (AMTA), Atlanta, GA, USA, 2017, pp. 1-6.
  22. Zhenfei, D. Gentle, C. Jun, W. Fayu and X. Ming, "Impedance mismatch correction for antenna gain measurement and its uncertainty evaluation," 2016 IEEE MTT-S International Conference on Numerical Electromagnetic and Multiphysics Modeling and Optimization (NEMO), Beijing, 2016, pp. 1-3.
  23. Dog Bone Tag (2017, December). Smartrac. [Online]. Available: https://www.smartrac-group.com/files/content/ Products_Services/PDF/0028_SMARTRAC_DOGBONE.pdf
  24. Impinj Multireader (2017, December). Impinj, Inc. [Online]. Available: https://www.google.co.nz/search?q=speedway+ miltireader+operation+guide&rlz=1C1CHBF_enNZ734NZ734&oq=speedway+miltireader+operation
  25. Styrofoam (2017, December). ECMA International. [Online]. Available: ref: https://www.ecma-international.org/ publications/files/ECMA-ST/Ecma-358.pdf

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2.

Authors:

Mohamed El-Tokhey, Yasser M. Mogahed, Mohamed Mamdouh, Tarek W. Hassan

Paper Title:

Establishment of New Continuous Operating Reference Station (CORS) at Faculty of Engineering, Ain Shams University

Abstract: In this work, establishment and operation of new Continuous Operating Reference Station (CORS), at Faculty of Engineering, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt, will be discussed. In addition, tying this station to the Egyptian CORS network will be performed using 3 different positioning techniques. The first technique is the Precise Point Positioning (PPP), while the second is the Differential Global Navigation Satellite System (DGNSS) technique with respect to the International GNSS Service (IGS) stations. The third technique is the DGNSS positioning with respect to stations of the Egyptian CORS network. Solutions of the third technique will be used as reference coordinates to assess the quality of using the PPP or the IGS DGNSS techniques in tying new stations, observed at the present time, to the Egyptian CORS network. Both techniques will be assessed using GNSS data for 4 days in month June 2017. In addition, 24 hours observation periods and 4 hour observation periods (day hours and night hours) will be evaluated. GNSS data, for the same 4 days, for a number of stations of the Egyptian CORS network were obtained from the Egyptian Survey Authority (ESA) to be used in the third technique to derive reference coordinates in the assessment process. This study shows that the IGS DGNSS solutions achieved much better results than the PPP solutions. The IGS DGNSS solutions could get coordinates with mean horizontal positional difference 2.5cm in case of using 24 hours observation periods, 3.5cm in case of using 4 hours (day hours) observation periods and 2.8cm in case of using 4 hours (night hours) observation periods. Generally, using the IGS DGNSS positioning technique in tying new stations to the Egyptian CORS network can achieve very promising results and help to avoid many administrative restrictions and additional costs. Also, the 4 hours observation periods can achieve promising results which make it applicable to the different surveying works performed in Egypt.

Keywords: CORS, DGNSS, IGS, PPP.

References:

  1. Ali. Positioning with Wide-Area GNSS Networks: Concept and Application. Positioning, Vol. 3 No. 1, pp. 1-6, doi:10.4236/pos. 2012.31001, 2012.
  2. Processing Report of the Egyptian Virtual Reference Stations Network. Egyptian Surveying Authority, 2012.
  3. Meng, A.H. Dodson, T. Moore, and G. Roberts. Ubiquitous Positioning: Anyone, Anything, Anytime, Anywhere. GPS World, 18(6): 60-65, 2007.
  4. Hofmann-Wellenhof, H. Lichtenegger, and J. Collins. Global Positioning System, Theory and Practice, Fifth, revised edition. Springer-Verlag Wien GmbH, 2001.
  5. Takasu. RTKLIB ver. 2.4.2 Manual, April 29, 2013.
  6. Trimble Inc. NetR9 GNSS Reference Receiver User Guide, version 4.15, revision A, May 2010.
  7. National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA). Department of Defense World Geodetic System 1984: Its Definition and Relationships with Local Geodetic Systems, July 8, 2014.

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3.

Authors:

J. Niresh, R. Kirubakaran, D. Karthick, R. Jerrom Joshua, M. Mohana Praddeesh

Paper Title:

Enhanced Two Wheeler Security Systems using Biometric Sensor and Numeric Keypad

Abstract: The main objective of the work is to eliminate the conventional method of unlocking a vehicle using keys. The work involves development of locking system in vehicles which includes the requirement of fingerprint and personal identification number to access the vehicle. This makes a two wheeler virtually unstealable. The idea of implementing both the fingerprint and PIN was created in order to ease the use of a two wheeler within the associated circle of people. Provisions will also be provided to change the PIN by the user itself. With this method of locking systems, we can eliminate the situational risk of losing a key. Moreover, digitizing the two wheelers may also aid in the reduction of weight and can support other electronic access in the future.

Keywords: Fps (Fingerprint Sensor), Matrix Keypad, Arduino Microcontroller, LED.

References:

  1. A “FINGERPRINT BASED IGNITION SYSTEM” International Journal of Computational Engineering Research / ISSN: 2250–3005.
  2. Prashantkumar R.(2013) “Two Wheeler Vehicle Security System” Published in International Journal of Engineering Sciences & Emerging Technologies, Dec. 2013. ISSN: 2231 – 6604 Volume 6, Issue 3, pp: 324334 ©IJE.
  3. Amit Saxena, “IGNITION BASED ON FINGERPRINT RECOGNITION” Published in International Journal of Scientific Research and Management Studies (IJSRMS) Volume 2 Issue1.
  4. AjinkyaKawale “Fingerprint based locking system” International Journal of Scientific & Engineering Research, Volume 4, Issue 5, May-2013.
  5. Omidiora E. O. “A Prototype of a Fingerprint Based Ignition Systems in Vehicles” European Journal of Scientific Research ISSN 1450-216X Vol.62 No.2 (2011), pp. 164-171.
  6. RoopamArora “START-UP THE ENGINE USING FINGERPRINTING” International Journal of Computer Engineering and Applications, Volume IX, Issue X, Oct. 15
  7. Brijet, B. Santhoshkumar*, N. Bharathi “Vehicle Anti-Theft System Using Fingerprint Recognition Technique” Journal of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences / ISSN: 0974-2115

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4.

Authors:

Fatima Jahan Sarmin, Md. Mamunur Rashid

Paper Title:

Various Types of Transparencies in Distributed Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Database Systems

Abstract: The architecture of database system becomes more complex day by day as different sites or organizations use different hardware, software, operating system or database. Not only is it about different systems, but also about different locations as same companies establish data centers at various part of the world. Distributed database system can connect the world in a system where a user thinks that it is a single system, but in architecture it is not. This heterogeneity leads to the thinking about the transparency in database management system. As whatever the system is, user need not to know about the internal architecture; they need only the accessibility of their information. And this is what transparency actually means presenting the whole system as a single system to the user and hiding the internal architecture. This paper briefly discusses the various types of transparency that need to be present in different types of distributed database systems. 

Keywords: Database, Distributed, Heterogeneous, Transparency.

References:

  1. Parul Tomar and Megha, “An Overview of Distributed Databases”, International Journal of Information and Computation Technology, ISSN 0974-2239 Volume 4, Number 2 (2014), pp. 207-214.
  2. Tamer Özsu, Patrick Valduriez, “Principles of Distributed Database Systems”
  3. Nitesh Kumar, Saurabh Bilgaiyan , Santwana Sagnika, “An Overview of Transparency in Homogeneous Distributed Database System”, International Journal of Advanced Research in Computer Engineering & Technology (IJARCET) Volume 2, Issue 10, October 2013
  4. O'Brien, J. & Marakas, G.M. (2008) Management Information Systems (pp. 185-189). New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Irwin.
  5. George Coulouris, Jean Dollimore, Tim Kindberg, “Distributed Systems Concepts and Design” 3rd edition, Addison-Wesley.
  6. Tamer Özsu and Patrick Valduriez, “DISTRIBUTED DATABASE SYSTEMS: WHERE ARE WE NOW?” IEEE Computer, Vol. 24, No. 8, August 1991.
  7. Banupriya and M.Natarajan “An Impression of Transparency in Distributed Database Management System: A Review”, International Journal of Trend in Research and Development, Volume 2(6), ISSN: 2394-9333.
  8. C. M. Jadhav and Bhaskar R Nadargi, “Implementation of Distribution Transparency in Heterogeneous Distributed Database System Using Aglet”, International Journal of Advanced Research in Computer Science and Software Engineering, Volume 4, Issue 10, October 2014, ISSN: 2277 128X.
  9. George Coulouris, Jean Dollimore, Tim Kindberg, Distributed Systems Concepts and Design, 3rd edition, Addison-Wesley.
  10. Michel Banatre, “Hiding Distribution in Distributed Systems”, Proceedings of the 13th international conference on Software engineering May 1991

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5.

Authors:

Jichkar R. R, Bharambe A. S, Hande P. R

Paper Title:

Comparison in Strength of Pervious Concrete Block by using Natural Course Aggregates and Plastic Coated Course Aggregates

Abstract: This paper presents comparison in strength of pervious concrete block by using Natural course aggregate (NCA) and plastic coated course aggregate (PCCA). Pervious concrete is a concrete which consists of course aggregate and cement paste. In this paper concrete made by NCA and PCCA. Previous studies indicate that pervious concrete has lower compressive strength capabilities than conventional concrete. This work investigated prior studies on the compressive strength on pervious concrete as it relates to water cement ratio, aggregate size and compaction and compare those results with results obtained in laboratory experiments conducted on sample of pervious concrete block made by NCA and PCCA. The present study investigated the use of waste plastic for the modification of properties of aggregate and compressive strength of PCCA pervious concrete. The plastic waste thoroughly mixes with hated aggregates forming a layer on the surface of the Natural aggregates. This PCCA aggregate tested for impact test, crushing value, specific gravity and water absorption. It has been found that there is significantly improvement in the properties of plastic coated aggregate and the compressive strength of PCA cubes is slightly less than the NCA cubes.  

Keywords: Plastic Waste, Natural Course Aggregate (NCA), Plastic Coated Course Aggregate (PCCA). 

References:

  1. Pratiksha Singh Rajput. And R.K.Yadav,(2016) “Effect of waste Plastic waste on properties of road aggregate”, IJIRST- International Journal for innovative research in science and technology, vol 2,Issue 11,April2016,ISSN(online)2349—6010
  2. Bhageerathy K.P., Anu P.Alex, Manju V.S., Raji A.K,(2014) “Use of Biomedical plastic waste in bituminous road construction, IJEAT- International Journal of engineering and Advance technology, ISSN:2249-8958,volume 3, Issue-6,August 2014
  3. Gawande A.,(2012) “An overview on waste plastic utilization in asphalting of roads” Journal of Engineering research and studies, volume 3, Issue2, PP.1-5
  4. Raji A.K.,(2007) “Utilization of marginal material as an ingredient in bituminous mixes”, Highway Research record No36,IRC,PP.42-43
  5. Vasudevan R,(2006) “Utilization of waste plastic for flexible pavement”, Indian Highway(IRC), Volume 34, no.7, PP.105-111
  6. Vasudevan R., and S.Rajasekaran.,(2007) “Utilization of waste polymer for flexible pavement and easy disposal of waste polymers”, Proceedings, of the International conference on  sustainable solid waste management,September,PP.105-111.
  7. Malhotra V.M.,(1976) “No fines concrete-its properties and applications, ACI Journal, November 1976,Volume 73,Issue 11,PP.628-644

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6.

Authors:

N. M. Khalil, Yousif Algamal

Paper Title:

Exploitation of Some Raw Minerals for Increasing Productivity of Ordinary Portland Cement

Abstract: This study aims to utilize a local natural mineral material from different places in western area of Saudi Arabia namely, (Osfan, Alkamel, Wadi starah, Khulais, Jeddah and Alghowla) as a partial replacement of ordinary portland cement (OPC) in order to increase the productivity of ordinary portland cement (OPC), minimizing the problems associated with its industry involving energy consumption and air pollution. In addition to the reference sample (C:100% wt. OPC), other six mixes were prepared from 75% wt. of OPC and 25 wt. %) of each raw mineral, they are denoted as (C1, C2, C3, C4, C5 and C6). Different cementing, sintering, chemical and mechanical properties of the prepared mixes were tested according to the international standard specifications. It was concluded that OPC blended with 25 wt.% of local natural minerals from Jeddah (C5), Wadi starah (C3) and Alkamel C2 show outstanding cementing and mechanical properties compared with the reference sample. They recorded relatively longer setting time ranges from (55-160, 52-145, 52-144) minutes compared with the reference sample (C) which recorded only (48-120) minutes, relatively higher percent of combined water at different ages of hydration (23.75-28.23, 20.84-24.59, 16.34-19.31%),respectively whereas the reference sample (C) recorded (15.59-18,00 %), higher heat of hydration (81-97, 77-94, 75-90 cal/g), respectively compared with reference sample which recorded (70- 85 cal/g ), higher bulk density (1.61-1.96, 1.66-1.84, 1.65-1.84 g/cm3), respectively compared with the reference sample that recorded (1.61-1.84 g/cm3), lower apparent porosity (15.02-10.41, 16.25-12.75, 17.40-13.96%), respectively whereas the reference sample noted (24.11-14.39%) and relatively higher values of compressive strength (90-125, 80-120, 75-113 kg/cm2), respectively compared with the reference sample which recorded (60-110 kg/cm2). The remaining samples C1, C4 and C6 showed less cementing and mechanical properties compared with the reference sample (C). The improved properties of C5, C3 and C2 are due to their relatively higher content of portlandite mineral (Ca(OH2)) one of the main hydration of cement, as well as their relatively better microstructure.

Keywords: Local Minerals, Cement, Compressive Strength, XRD, SEM.

References:

  1. M. Khalil, El-Taher Hassen, M. M. Shakdofa and M. Farahat, J. Indust. & Chem. Eng., 20(2014) 2998.
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  7. Yamamichi, F. Qingge, S. Sugita, 6th Proc. CANMET/ACI Inter. Conf.  Durab.  Concr. SP-212 (2003) 891.
  8. S. A. Memon, M. A. Shaikh, H. Akbar, Constr. Build. Mate 25 (2011)1044.
  9. K. Metha, N. Pitt, Res. Recov.Conserv. 2 (1976) 23.
  10. Tuts, HRDU publications (1990).
  11. K. Mehta, US Patent No: 5346548 (1994).
  12. Stroven, D. D. Bui, E. Sabuni, Fuel 78 (1999) 153.
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  15. Federal Highway Administration, U.S. Dept. Transp., Fly ash for highway , FHWA-SA-94-081, August (1975).
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7.

Authors:

N.S. Ugwuanyi, T.C. Madueme

Paper Title:

Enhanced Transmission Line Protection Based on Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT)

Abstract: In order to reduce damage of transmission line due to fault, reliable, high-speed, sensitive and dependable protection system is a primary requirement of today’s interconnected power system. It is pertinent to not only detect faults at exactly their time of occurrence, but also to classify them for appropriate restorative decision to be made. In this paper, approach for the protection of transmission line which uniquely manipulates the coefficient energy of Wavelet Transforms to generate ratios that are used for both detection and classification of transmission line faults. The fault current signals generated by MATLAB/SIMULINK simulation have been analyzed using Daubechie-4 (d4) mother wavelet at 7th level decomposition with the help of Wavelet Toolbox embedded in MATLAB. The value of the coefficient energy of the current signals gives the indication of fault and no-fault conditions. Also, the coefficient energy ratios were calculated to help classify the faults. This approach was applied to 132Kv case study and ten classes of fault could be correctly identified and classified within fault duration of 0.01 seconds.

Keywords: Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT), Transmission Line Protection, Multi-Resolution Analysis (MRA), Wavelet Energy ratio. 

References:

  1. M. Silva, Fault Detection and Classification in Transmission Lines Based on Wavelet Transform and ANN, IEEE Transactions on power delivery, vol. 21, no. 4, pp.2058-2063, October 2006.
  2. V. Babu, M. Tripathy and A. K. Singh, Recent techniques used in transmission line protection: a review, International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology Vol. 3, No. 3, pp. 1-8, 2011.
  3. Shukla, P. Jaiswal, R. Dubey and S. Dohre, Techniques for transmission line failure detection and control: A review, International Journal of Innovative Research and studies, Vol. 2 Issue 3, pp.1-10, March, 2013.
  4. M. Rao and P.M. Deoghare, Novel Approach for Transmission Line Protection Using Wavelet Transform and Neural Network, International Journal of Instrumentation, Control and Automation ISSN : 2231-1890 Volume-1, Issue 2, pp.16-21, 2011.
  5. Yadav and Y. Dash, An Overview of Transmission Line Protection by Artificial Neural Network: Fault Detection, Fault Classification, Fault Location, and Fault Direction Discrimination, Advances in Artificial Neural Systems Hindawi Publishing Corporation, pp.1-20, December 28 2014
  6. Oonsivilai and S. Saichoomdee, Appliance of Recurrent Neural Network toward Distance Transmission Lines Protection, IEEE Region 10 Conference, TENCON 2009.
  7. C. Wakhare and N. B. Wagh, Review of Various Algorithms for Protection of Transmission Line, International Journal of Engineering Research & Technology Vol. 4 Issue 01, pp.346-351, January 2015.
  8. Chaithanya and A.M. Rao , PLL with Fuzzy Logic Controller Aided Fast Protection of Strong Power System, International Journal of Advanced Research in Electrical, Electronics and Instrumentation Engineering Vol. 3, Issue 8, pp.11501-11512, August 2014.
  9. Borkhade, Transmission Line Fault Detection Using Wavelet Transform, International Journal on Recent and Innovation Trends in Computing and Communication Volume: 2 Issue: 10, pp3138 – 3142, October 2014.
  10. Jan´ıˇcek and M. Mucha, A new protection relay based on fault Transient analysis usingwavelet transform, Journal of Electrical Engineering, Vol. 58, No. 5, pp.271–278, 2007,
  11. Shariatinasab, M. Akbari and B. Rahmani, Application of Wavelet Analysis in Power Systems, Advances in Wavelet Theory and Their Applications in Engineering, Physics and Technology, pp.221-244, 2012. Available from: http://www.intechopen.com/books/advances-in-wavelet-theory-and-their-applications-in-engineering-physicsand-technology/application-of-wavelet-analysis-in-power-systems
  12. J. Reddy and D.K. Mohanta, A wavelet-fuzzy combined approach for classification and location of transmission line faults, Electrical Power and Energy Systems 29 ,pp.669–678, 2007. Available on: www.sciencedirect.com.
  13. S. Rao and B.B Naik, Pattern Recognition Approach for Fault Identification in Power Transmission Lines, Int. Journal of Engineering Research and Applications, Vol. 3, Issue 5, pp.1051-1056, Sep-Oct 2013.
  14. C. Mishra and P. M. Deoghare, Analysis of Transmission Line Fault by Using Wavelet, International Journal of Engineering Research & Technology, Vol. 3 Issue 5, pp.36-40, May 2014
  15. L. Tandan and A. Mandal, Identification of Faults and its Location in Transmission Line by using Wavelet Transform, Journal of Engineering Research & Technology, Vol. 4 Issue 03, pp.526-530, March 2015
  16. Saini, A. A. Bin Mohd zin, M. W. Bin Mustafa and A. R. Sultan, An accurate fault detection and location on transmission line using wavelet based on Clarke’s transformation, Przegląd Elektrotechniczny, Vol. 90, No 11 , pp.156-161, 2014
  17. Patel and A. Christian, Wavelet Transform Application to Fault Classification on Transmission Line, Indian Journal of Applied Research, Vol : 5, Issue 2, pp.208-212, Feb 2015.

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8.

Authors:

Akhil S. Nair, P. R. Sreemahadevan Pillai

Paper Title:

The Effect of GGBFS and Copper Slag on Strength of Self Compacting Concrete: An Experimental Study

Abstract: The depletion of the natural resources and increased demand of constructional materials have always paved way for new advancements in the construction field. Engineers started research to find an alternative for the natural resources. Even though natural resources cannot be substituted completely, a partial replacement technique was introduced. Self-compacting concrete (SCC) can be defined as a fresh concrete which possesses superior flow ability under maintained stability, thus allowing self-compaction that is, material consolidation without addition of energy. Self-compacting concrete is a fluid mixture suitable for placing in structures with congested reinforcement without vibration and it helps in achieving higher quality of surface finishes. However partial substitution of cement and fine aggregate by locally available waste materials like Ground Granulated Blast Furnace Slag (GGBFS) and copper slag have showed increase in the strength of SCC. 

Keywords: Self-Compacting Concrete, Copper Slag, GGBFS, Partial Substitution

References:

  1. Shi C, Meyer C, Behnood A. Utilization of copper slag in cement and concrete Resources, Conservation and Recycling, 52, 2008.
  2. Murthi, P., Sivakumar, V., Strength-Porosity relationship for ternary blended concrete, Indian Concrete Journal, Vol. 82, Issue 7, p 35, 2008.
  3. Mostafa Khanzadi, Ali Behnood, “ Mechanical properties of high strength concrete incorporating copper slag as coarse aggregate”, Construction and Building Materials, 2009
  4. Ghazi F Kheder, Rand S Al Jaidiri “New Method for Proportioning Self-Consolidating Concrete Based on Compressive Strength Requirements”ACI Materials 107(5):490-497, 2010
  5. Meenakshi Sudarvizhi. S, Ilangovan. R “Performance of Copper slag and ferrous slag as partial replacement of sand in Concrete” Tamil Nadu India 2011.
  6. Muddapu Swaroopa Rani, “Behaviour of Self Compacting Concrete made with GGBFS and RHA under axial compression and flexure” JAWAHARLAL NEHRU TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY, Hyderabad India 2011.
  7. Nitish Chalhotra, ME Thesis, “Properties of Self-Compacting Concrete Containing Fly Ash and Silica Fume” Thapar University Patiala, 2011
  8. S. SHETTY, Concrete Technology, 23th Edn, S.chand & Company Ltd.,2011
  9. Krishna Murthy.N, Narasimha Rao A.V, Ramana Reddy I .V and Vijaya sekhar Reddy.M,” Mix Design Procedure for Self Compacting Concrete”, IOSR Journal of Engineering (IOSRJEN) e-ISSN: 2250-3021, p-ISSN: 2278-8719, Volume 2, Issue 9 (September 2012), PP 33-41.
  10. A. Ganeshwaran, Suji, S. Deepashri ., “Evaluation Of Mechanical Properties Of Self Consolidating Concrete With Manufactured Sand And Fly Ash”, Vol. 3, pp. 60-69, 2012.
  11. Seeni, Dr.C.Selvamony, Dr.S.U.Kannan, Dr.M.S.Ravikumar “Experimental Study of Partial Replacement of Fine Aggregate with Waste Material from China Clay Industries”, Tamil Nadu India 2012.
  12. Prajapati Krishnapal, Yadav R.K, Chandak Rajeev , “Strength Characteristics of Self Consolidating Concrete Containing Flyash” Vol. 2,pp. 1-5,2013
  13. Edwin Fernando, Vandana C.J, Indu.G.Nair “Experimental Investigation Of Self Compacting Concrete With Copper Slag” Coimbatore, India-2014
  14. Ankit J Patel, “SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE WITH USE OF WASTE MATERIAL” (Ass Prof) S.V.B.I.T Gandhinagar India 2014 .
  15. A, Dr Krishnamoorthi.S and RampradheepG.S, ” Study on properties of self-consolidating concrete with fly ash and silica fume”, International Journal of Innovative Research in Science,
  16. Engineering and Technology (An ISO 3297: 2007 Certified Organization) Vol. 3, Issue 4, April 2014.
  1. Keerdhana B, Manjunath.N.V and Muthupriya.P, “Strength study on fibre reinforced self-compacting concrete with fly ash and GGBFS”, International Journal of Advanced Structures and Geotechnical Engineering ISSN 2319-5347, Vol. 03, No. 02, April 2014.
  2. SeshaPhani ,Dr.Seshadri Sekhar T , Dr.Srinivasa Rao ,Dr.Sravana ., “Evaluation of Relationship Between Mechanical Properties of High Strength Self Consolidating Concrete”, Vol .2 ,pp. 67 – 71, 2013.
  3. IS: 8112-1989.Specifications for 43 grade Portland cement, Bureau of Indian Standards, New Delhi, India
  4. Naik, T.R., Singh S, “Influence of fly ash on setting and hardening characteristics of concrete systems” Materials Journal, Vol.94, Issue 5, pp.355-360.
  5. Manu Santhanam and Subramanian, S. “Current developments in self-compacting concrete” Indian Concrete Journal, June, Vol., pp11-22.

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9.

Authors:

Rana Refaat

Paper Title:

Parametric Study in Office Building for Daylighting Performance and Energy Saving

Abstract: This paper utilized simulation techniques for identifying the most efficient glazing with a good WWR and a proper daylight autonomy by controlling the thermal heat gain and reducing cooling load as well as energy consumption .daylighting inside space specially offices is one of the most important concerns because of its significance role in energy consumption and its ability to provide a comfort environment inside space for occupants and Productive workers. Utilization of daylight in buildings may result in reduction in electricity consumption for lighting but also in high cooling demand if excessive solar gains are admitted in the working space. Moreover, visual comfort should be ensured especially for perimeter office spaces. Window size and type should be considered as an integral part of fenestration system design for office buildings in order to balance daylighting requirements versus the need to reduce solar gains. performance predictions and simulations can help in identifying strategies for reducing energy consumption and improving building performance by rigorous analysis process and that’s what is this research method ,The implementation of the simulation process is carries out by using Rhinoceros 3D modeling which supports DIVA for rhino (a plugin for rhinoceros modeling software) and DIVA uses RADIANCE and DAYSIM and its basic daylight as a simulation engine to space with southern orientation in Alexandria, Egypt. The simulation process performed by using daylight autonomy and thermal analysis. The outcome of this research is as expected choosing the proper glazing type is a huge factor of reducing energy, controlling heat gaine and providing a good thermal comfort . Glazing with less u -value and less visual transmittance are more savers for the energy as a result of less gaining of the heat and less cooling energy. the single pan glazing and the double pan clear glazing are the least energy savers glazing with a higher monthly energy use 379 kwh and 353 kwh in the same order and the higher illuminance in the room , the ElectrochromicGlazings is giving a good illuminance for the space but a high energy use 319 kwh . then the coming three glazing are very similar to each other coming in the first place the Glazing_DoublePane_LowE with 261 kwh and then Glazing_DoublePane_LowE_Argon with 268 kwh and the last is the TripleGlazing_TriplePane_Krypton with 263 kwh with least illuminance between 300 and 3000 lux which is the Useful daylight illuminance range 29.2 % .  

Keywords: Daylighting, Glazing System, Cooling Energy, Energy Consumption. 

References:

  1. Yassin, a.a., sheta, s.a. And elwazeer, m.a., 2017. Parametric study on window-wall ratio (wwr) for day lighting optimization in multi-story residential buildings: case study of an apartment complex in mansoura city, egypt. Int. Adv. Res. J. Sci. Eng. Technol, 4, pp.21-32.
  2. Muneer, solar radiation and daylight models for the energy efficient design of buildings (architectural press, uk, 1997)
  3. Muneer, solar radiation and daylight models for the energy efficient design of buildings (architectural press, uk, 1997)
  4. Tzempelikos, a. And athienitis, a.k., 2005, may. The effect of shading design and control on building cooling demand. In proceedings of the international conference on passive and low energy cooling for the built environment, santorini, greece (pp. 953-958).
  5. O'conner, j., lee, e., rubinstein, f. And selkowitz, s., 1997. Tips for daylighting with windows.
  6. Erlendsson, ö. (2014). Daylight optimization-a parametric study of atrium design: early stage design guidelines of atria for optimization of daylight autonomy.
  7. Acosta, i., campano, m.a. And molina, j.f., 2016. Analysis of energy savings and visual comfort produced by the proper use of windows. International journal of engineering and technology, 8(5), p.358.
  8. Krarti, m., erickson, p.m. And hillman, t.c., 2005. A simplified method to estimate energy savings of artificial lighting use from daylighting. Building and environment, 40(6), pp.747-754.
  9. Bodart, m. And de herde, a., 2002. Global energy savings in offices buildings by the use of daylighting. Energy and buildings, 34(5), pp.421-429.
  10. Lee, j.w., jung, h.j., park, j.y., lee, j.b. And yoon, y., 2013. Optimization of building window system in asian regions by analyzing solar heat gain and daylighting elements. Renewable energy, 50, pp.522-531.
  11. Yun, g., yoon, k.c. And kim, k.s., 2014. The influence of shading control strategies on the visual comfort and energy demand of office buildings. Energy and buildings, 84, pp.70-85.
  12. The role of window glazing on daylighting and energy saving in buildings. Renewable and sustainable energy reviews, 42, pp.323-343.
  13. Reinhart, c. F., mardaljevic, j., & rogers, z. (2006). Dynamic daylight performance metrics for sustainable building design. Leukos, 3(1), 7-31.
  14. Hegazy, m., attia, s., & moro, j. (2013, august). Parametric analysis for daylight autonomy and energy consumption in hot climates. In 13th conference of international building performance simulation association (pp. 2232-2240).

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10.

Authors:

A. S. Adeoye, G. O. Adeyemi, B. A. Alo

Paper Title:

Mechanical Stabilization of a Migmatite-Gneiss Derived Lateritic Soil from Ibadan, Southwestern Nigeria

Abstract: Samples of migmatite-gneiss-derived lateritic soil from Moniya, Ibadan southwestern Nigeria were stabilized with between 0 and 20% by volume of nearby termite-reworked soil under different energies of compaction. This was with a view to determining the influence of termite-reworked soil on some engineering properties of the soil. The amounts of termite-reworked soil mixed with the adjacent residual lateritic soil prior to compaction were 0, 10 and 20%, while each mixed soil was subjected to 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 blows of a 4.5 Kg Rammer falling from a height of 0.46 metre during compaction. Strong positive correlations of 0.94 and 0.99 were established between the maximum dry density and the percentage of volume of stabilizer of the samples compacted with 30 and 60 blows respectively. Negative correlations of -0.87 and -0.91 were found between the optimum moisture content and percentage of termite-reworked soils compacted at 30 and 60 blows respectively. The highest uncured and sun-cured compressive strength of 206KPa and 2148KPa were `respectively The influence of termite-reworked soils on the compaction characteristic of the soil thus increases with the energy of compaction. The influence of stabilization with termite-reworked soil on the unconfined compressive strength of the soil was found to be strongest upon compaction at highest levels for the sample stabilized with 20%by volume of termite-reworked soil. The highest unsoaked CBR value of 42.83% and soaked CBR value of 16.20% were obtained when 20% by volume of stabilizer was added to the soil. This implies that the influence of stabilizer was strongest when 20% by volume of termite-reworked soil was added to the studied soil. Results showed that the termite-reworked soil samples had better geotechnical properties than the soil developed over migmatite-gneiss based on the grading and plasticity characteristics. Compaction parameters, unconfined compressive strength and California Bearing Ratio of the stabilized samples were found to be significantly improved when compacted with 20% by volume of the termite-reworked soil. The sun-cured unconfined compressive strength of 2148KPa obtained for samples compacted at the modified American Association of the State Highways and Transportation Officials level shows they can be good for building bricks and road construction. 

Keywords: Migmatite-Gneiss; Stabilization; Termite-Reworked Soil; Unconfined Compressive Strength; California Bearing Ratio

References:

  1. Abolurin, S. B. 1992. Strength chacteristics of a cement and lime-stabilized lateritic soil. Unpublished B.Sc. (Civil engineering project Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria. 208p.
  2. Adedeji, B. G. 2001. Mechanical stabilization of a lateritic soil in Ago-Iwoye, southwestern Nigeria. Unpublished B.Sc. (Geology) Project, Olabisi Onabanjo University, Ago-Iwoye, Nigeria.
  3. Adeyemi, G. O. 1992. Highway geotechnical properties of laterised residual soils in the Ajebo-Ishara geological transition zone of southwestern Nigeria. Unpublished Ph.D. Thesis, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria.
  4. Adeyemi, G. O. and Salami, R. O. 2004. Some geotechnical properties two termite-reworked lateritic soils from Ago-Iwoye, Southwestern, Nigeria. Journal of Geotechnology, Mineral Wealth 133/2004 pp. 35-41
  5. Alexander, C. T. and Cady, J. G. 1962. Genesis and hardening of laterite soils. U. S. Dept. of Agric. Tech. Bull. No. 1282.
  6. Asphalt Institute 1962. The Asphalt Handbook, Maryland, U.S.A., 176p.
  7. De-Graft-Johnson, J. W. S. and Bhatia, H. S. 1969. Engineering properties of lateritic soils. General report of specialty session on engineering properties of lateritic soils. In: 7th
  8. De-Graft-Johnson, J. W. S. and Bhatia, H. S. 1970. Definition, formation and classification of lateritic soils. Proceedings of the specialty session on Engineering properties of lateritic soils. Seventh International Conference of soil mechanics and Foundation Engineering. Asian Institute of Technology.Bangkok, Thailand, 14-43.
  9. Federal Ministry of Works and Housing, 1970. Specification for Roads and Brigdes, Vol. 2, pp. 137-275.
  10. Gidigasu, M. D. 1976. Laterite soil engineering Elsevier, Amsterdam, 554pp
  11. Madedor, A. O. 1983. Pavement design guidelines and practice for geological areas in Nigeria. In Ola, S. A. (ed) “Tropical soils of Nigeria in Engineering Practice” A. A. Balkema (publisher) Rotterdam  291-297.
  12. Ogunjobi, O. B. 2006. Stabilization of a residual lateritic soil with termite-reworked soils. Unpublished M.Sc. Thesis. Department of Geology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.
  13. Ola, S. A. 1977. Laboratory Test on the Influence of Cement, Lime and Bitumen on Soils. Journal of Transportation Division, American Society of Civil Engineers.
  14. Olowe, A. B. 1985. Effect of cement-lime mixture on some geotechnical properties of laterite soil. Unpublished B.Sc. (Civil engineering) project. Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria.
  15. Tuncer, E. R. and Lohnes, R. A. 1977. An engineering classification for certain basalt-derived lateritic soils. Engineering Geology, Amsterdam. 2(4): 319-339.

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11.

Authors:

Ehsan Amini, Setareh Oruji

Paper Title:

Decentralization in Central Business District of City by Land Use Pattern Alteration to Promote Pedestrian Movement through Urban Design Strategies Case Study: Sabzevar City, Iran

Abstract: Cities are perhaps one of humanity’s most complex creations, never finished, never definitive. They are like a journey that never ends. Their evolution is determined by their ascent into greatness or their descent into decline. They are the past, the present and the future. Cities in developing countries like Iran are facing some of the concern are: motor vehicle congestion and urban growth. However, the concern in cities like Sabzevar is that this growth is far more rapid (especially increasing day by day motor vehicle). Like many urban processes the spatial nature of these problems is self-evident. In order to solve urban mobility problems, this work aims to clarify urban land use changes of the CBD in a city. Sabzevar city is selected as the study area, because due to excessive focus of attractive land use, functional differentiation is developed as a result of rapid urban growth. In this paper, the authors analyse patterns of land use in CBD and examines the relation between these patterns and the movement of population.

Keywords: Decentralization, traffic congestion, changing land use pattern, Sabzevar city, pedestrian movement, vehicle movement.

References:

  1. Ehsan Amini, Shankar B, 2017, Strategies for Pedestrianizing Central Business District of Sabzevar City, University of Mysore, International Journal of Engineering Trends and Technology (IJETT) – Volume 46 Number 5 April 2017.
  2. Ehsan Amini, Shankar B, 2017, Challenges of Vehicle Parking in Central Business District of SabzevarCity, Iran, Ehsan Amini et al. / International Journal of Engineering and Technology (IJET).
  3. Peter A.G. van Bergeijk (Supervisor) Prof. Murshed, S.M (Reader), 2012, The Relation between Land Price and Distance to CBD in Bekasi, international institute of social studies. file:///C:/Users/user/Downloads/Yowaldi%20Yowaldi_RP%20Final-SB1394_1545.pdf.
  4. SabzevarMunicipality Archive, 2013
  5. Sumeeta Srinivasan, land use change as a tool: a framework to link transportation and the environment in New Delhi, India, Division of Engineering and Applied Sciences Harvard University.
  6. Tetsuji ISHIMARU, Land Use Change of the Surrounding Areas of the CBD in Fukuoka City,https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/jjhg1948/40/2/40_2_99/_pdf/-char/en.
  7. Gehl, Dr. Litt and Helle Lis Søholt, 2002, Public Spaces and Public Life City of Adelaide, https://www.parksleisure.com.au/documents/item/773.

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12.

Authors:

Kiran T. S, Bisharathubeevi A, K. N. Pavithran

Paper Title:

GA Optimized Weighted Random Pulse Width Modulation Approach for the Elimination of Harmonic Distortion for Multilevel Inverters

Abstract: This paper proposes an optimized weighted random pulse width modulation (WRPWM) scheme for multilevel power converters, for the elimination of harmonic distortion present at the output of the converter. In weighted random pulse width modulation, the PWM signal is generated by comparing random binary numbers with the fundamental reference signal. The proposed optimized WRPWM strategy provides an improved performance over traditional random pulse width modulation schemes for multilevel inverters. A binary valued Genetic algorithm (GA) is employed for the optimization process. The total harmonic distortion (THD) is taken as the performance index for optimization. Simulation results of optimized WRPWM scheme for a three-level and five-level inverters are presented in this paper. 

Keywords: Genetic Algorithm (GA), Random pulse width modulation (RPWM), Total Harmonic Distortion (THD), Weighted Random Pulse Width Modulation (WRPWM). 

References:

  1. Kiran TS, KN Pavithran ,”Novel Approach For Harmonic Reduction With Random Pwm Technique For Multilevel Inverters”, IEEE International conference on PICC, 2015.
  2. Stanislaw Legowski, Andrzej M. Trzynadlowski, “Advanced Random Pulse Width Modulation Technique for Voltage Controlled Inverter Drive Systems,” International Journal of Electronics, vol.68, no.6, 1991.
  3. G. Hsktler and D. M. Divan, “Acoustic Noise Reduction in Sinusoidal PWM Dnves Using a Randomly Modulated Carrier,” IEEE Tronsacrions on Power Electronics, Vo1.6, no. 3, pp. 356-363, I991.
  4. L. Kirlin, S. Kwok, and A. M. Trrynadlowski, “Power Spectra ofa PWM Inverter with Randomized PulsePosition,” in Proc. PESC’93, pp. 1041- 1047, 1993.
  5. Y. R. (Ron) Hui, S. Sathiakumar, and ki-Kwong Sung ”Novel Random PWM schemes with Weighted Switching Decision,”IEEE Tans. Power Electronics, vol.12,, pp.945-952, 1997.
  6. M. Tolbert, F. Z. Peng, Thomas G. Habetlet “Multilevel PWM Methods at Low Modulation indices,” APEC’99, Dallas, Texas, March 14-18, pp.1424 -1431.
  7. Yash Shrivastava and S Y (Ron) Hui, “Analysis of Random PWM Switching Methods for Three-level power Inverters,” IEEE Trans. Power Electron. 14, no. 6, pp.1156–1163, Nov. 1999.
  8. S. Lai and F. Z. Peng, “Multilevel converters – A new breed of power converters,” IEEE Transactions on Industry Applications, vol. 32, no. 3, May /June 1996, pp. 509-517.
  9. L. M. Tolbert, F. Z. Peng, T. G. Habetler, “Multilevel converters for Large electric drives,”IEEE Transactions on Industry Applications, vol.35, no. 1, Jan./Feb. 1999, pp. 36-44.

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13.

Authors:

G. Padmavathi

Paper Title:

Technological Impact on Higher Education- Challenges and Opportunities from the Perception of Two Important Segments

Abstract: Technology has transformed the higher education system in this decade. Some important initiatives of this decade like, Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC), user friendly Mobile Communication Technology and Wearable Technologies have redefined the teaching/ learning process. Explosive growth in the number of online courses, pervasiveness of mobile devices, and the impact of social media have created lot of awareness and innovative ideas and practices among the present generation of learners. This is high time that the two important segments of higher education namely, the teachers and the learners (students) revisit the conventional methodologies of teaching/ learning process and upgrade their methods to be on par with the global scenario and tune themselves with the ever growing technological advancements. This study discusses some of the significant technologies in higher education, how the growth in education technology opened up both challenges and opportunities for both the communities in brief. The global views and experiences of some significant players are summarized here.

Keywords: Terms: Higher Education, Technology Support, Challenges, Opportunities, Student-Teacher Perception, Global Views. 

References:

  1. Chris Proulx. (2013). 5 ways Technology Will Impact Higher Education in 2013, Report of President and CEO, eCornell, Cornell University.
  2. Hope Reese. (2015). Reimagining College: Higher Education in the 21st Century, IdeaFestival.
  3. Johnson, L., Adams Becker., S., Cummins M. Estrada, V Freeman A and Ludgate H. (2013). NMC Horizon Report, Higher Education Edition, Austin, Texas: The New Media Consortium.
  4. Ronen Shay. (2013). 5 advantages and 5 disadvantages of technology in higher education, Technical report, University of Florida.
  5. Raechelle Clemmons. (2014). Technology’s impact on Higher Education, Report of the Vice President and Chief Information Officer, St. Norbert College.

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14.

Authors:

Vinod B. R., Shiny G.

Paper Title:

A Multilevel Inverter fed Direct Torque Control Strategy for an Induction Motor using PI Controllers

Abstract: This paper presents a multilevel inverter fed direct torque control scheme for an open-end winding configured induction motor drive. Unlike the hysteresis controller based direct torque control strategy, the control scheme comprising of the torque and flux control by rotating reference frame quadrature-axis and direct-axis voltage components respectively. Here, Proportional Integral controllers are used for the generation of these voltage components. In the modulation part, a fractal based space vector direct torque control algorithm is used for sector identification and determination of associated switching vectors. Moreover, the algorithm incorporates a computationally efficient 600 coordinate system for representing the space vectors instead of the conventional Cartesian coordinate system. The speed reversal, steady-state and dynamic performance of the scheme is thoroughly analyzed under loading conditions. The multilevel inverter drive is implemented on an open-end winding type induction motor. A six level inverter fed direct torque controlled drive was designed and implemented by using a 2 Hp induction motor. The loading performance of the scheme is tested on a mechanical load with a 5Hp induction motor. All the experimental waveforms were captured under closed loop mode and the results are presented to validate the scheme. 

Keywords: Direct Torque Control; Induction Motor; Loading; Six Level Inverter; Space Vector. 

References:

  1. Takahashi and T. Noguchi, “A new quick-response and high efficiency control strategy of an induction motor,” IEEE Trans. on Ind. Appl., vol.IA-22, pp. 820–827, Sep. 1986.
  2. Casadei, F. Profumo, G. Serra, and A. Tani, “FOC and DTC: Two viable schemes for induction motors torque control,” IEEE Trans. on Power Electron., vol. 17, no. 5, pp. 779–787, Sep. 2002.
  3. K. Mohapatra, R. S. Kanchan, M. R. Baiju, P. N. Tekani, and K. Gopakumar, “Independent field-oriented control of two split-phase induction motors from a single six-phase inverter,” IEEE Trans. Ind. Electron., vol. 52, no. 5, pp. 1372–1382, Oct. 2005.
  4. Jidin, N. R. N. Idris, A. H. M. Yatim, T. Sutikno, and M. E. Elbuluk, “An Optimized Switching Strategy for Quick Dynamic Torque Control in DTC-Hysteresis-Based Induction Machines,” IEEE Trans. Ind. Electron., vol. 58, no. 8, pp. 3391–3400, Aug. 2011.
  5. Zhang, J. Zhu, Z. Zhao, W. Xu, and D. G. Dorrel, “An improved direct torque control for three-level inverter-fed induction motor sensorless drive,” IEEE Trans. Power Electron., vol. 27, no. 3, pp. 1502–1513, Mar. 2012.
  6. S. Choi, H. H. Choi, and J. W. Jung, “Feedback linearization direct torque control with reduced torque and flux ripples for IPMSM drives,” IEEE Trans. Power Electron., vol. 31, no. 5, pp. 3728–3737, May 2016.
  7. Deepu, X. Zhang, and G. H. B. Foo, “Three-level inverter-fed direct torque control of IPMSM with constant switching frequency and torque ripple reduction,” IEEE Trans. Ind. Electron., vol. 63, no. 12, pp. 7908–7918, Dec. 2016.
  8. K. Pandit, M. V. Aware, R. V. Nemade, and E. Levi, “Direct Torque Control scheme for a six-phase induction motor with redued torque ripple,” IEEE Trans. Power Electron., vol. 32, no. 9, pp. 7118–7129, Sep. 2017
  9. N. Tatte and M. V. Aware, “Torque ripple and Harmonic current reduction in a Three-level inverter-fed direct torque controlled Five-phase induction motor,” IEEE Trans. Ind. Electron., vol. 64, no.7,pp. 5265–5275, Jul. 2017.
  10. N. Tatte and M. V. Aware, “Direct Torque Control of five-phase induction motor with common-mode voltage an current harmonics reduction,” IEEE Trans. Power Electron., vol. 32, no.11, pp. 8644–8654, Nov. 2017.
  11. S. Buja and M. P. Kazmierkowski, “Direct torque control of PWM inverter-fed AC motors- A survey,” IEEE Trans. Ind. Electron., vol. 51, no. 4,pp. 744–757, Aug. 2004.
  12. Casadei, G. Serra, A. Tani, and L. Zarri, “Direct torque control for induction machine: a technology status review,”in Proc. Int. Conf. WEMDCD,Delhi, india, Jan. 2013, pp. 117–129.
  13. Niu, B. Wang, A. S. Babel, K. Li, and E. G. Strangas, “Comparative evaluation of Direct Torque Control strategies for Permanent Magnet Synchronous Machines,” IEEE Trans. Power Electron., vol. 31, no. 2, pp. 1408–1424, Feb. 2016.
  14. Rodriguez, J.-S. Lai, and F. Z. Peng, “Multilevel Inverters: A Survey of Topologies, Controls, and Applications,” IEEE Trans. Ind. Electron., vol. 49, no. 4, pp. 724–736, Aug. 2002
  15. Kouro, R. Bernal,H. Miranda, C. A. Silva, and J. Rodriguez, “High performance torque and flux control for multilevel inverter fed induction motors,” IEEE Trans. Power Electron., vol. 22, no. 6, pp. 2116–2123, Nov. 2007.
  16. Khoucha, S. M. Lagoun, K. Marouani, A. Kheloui, and M. E. H. Benbouzid, “Hybrid cascaded H-Bridge multilevel-inverter induction-motor-drive direct torque control for automotive applications,” IEEE Trans. Ind. Electron., vol. 57, no. 3,pp. 892–899, Mar. 2010.
  17. T. Somasekhar, K. Gopakumar, M. R. Baiju, K. K. Mohapatra, and L. Umanand, “A multilevel inverter system for an induction motor with open-end winding,” IEEE Trans. Ind. Electron., vol. 52, no. 3, pp. 824–836, Jun. 2005.
  18. R. Baiju, K. Gopakumar, K. K. Mohapatra, V. T. Somasekhar, and L. Umanand, “Five-level inverter voltage-space phasor generation for an open-end winding induction motor drive,” IEE Proc.-Electr. Power Appl., vol. 150, no. 5, pp. 531–538, Sep 2003.
  19. Patel, P. P. Rajeevan,A. Dey, R. Ramchand, K. Gopakumar, and M. P. Kazmierkowski, “Fast direct torque control of an open-end induction motor drive using 12-sided polygonal voltage space vectors,” IEEE Trans. Power Electron., vol. 27, no. 1,pp. 400–410, Jan. 2012.
  20. K. Rahim, F. Patkar,A. Jidin, and A. Razi, “Reduced torque ripple and switching frequency using optimal dtc switching strategy for open-end winding of induction machines,” in Proc. IEEE Int. Conf. PEDS, Jun. 2015, pp. 767-772.
  21. Celanovic and D. Boroyevich, “A fast space vector modulation algorithm for multilevel three-phase converters,”IEEE Trans. Ind. Appl., vol. 37, no. 2, pp. 637–641, Apr. 2001.
  22. Gopinath, A. S. Aneesh Mohamed, and M. R. Baiju, “Fractal based space vector PWM for inverters – A novel approach,” IEEE Trans. Ind. Electron., vol. 52, no. 4, pp. 1230–1238, Apr. 2009.
  23. Shiny G. and M. R. Baiju, “Fractal based low computation space phasor generation scheme for a four-level inverter using an open-end winding induction motor,” IET Electr. Power Appl., vol. 6, no. 9, pp. 652–660, Jun. 2012.
  24. Shiny G. and M. R. Baiju, “Space vector pulse width modulation strategy for an even level inverter,” in IEEE Int. Conf. TAP ENERGY 2017, to be published.
  25. Jacob and M. R. Baiju, “Space-vector quantized dithered sigma-delta modulator for reducing the harmonic noise in multilevel converters,” IEEE Trans. Ind. Electron., vol. 62, no. 4, pp. 2064–2072, Apr. 2015.
  26. Joohn-Sheok Kim and Seung-Ki Sul, “A Novel Voltage Modulation Technique of the Space Vector PWM,” in Proc. Int. Conf. IPEC Yokohama, 1995, pp. 742–747.
  27. Zhang, Y. Zhao, W. Qiao, and L. Qu, “A Space Vector Modulated Sensorless Direct Torque control for Direct-Drive PMSG Wind Turbines,” IEEE Trans. Ind. Appl., vol. 50, no. 4, pp. 2331–2341, Aug. 2014.
  28. Venkataramana Naik, A. Panda, and S. P. Singh, “A three-level Fuzzy-2 DTC of induction motor drive using SVPWM,” IEEE Trans. Ind. Electron., vol. 63, no. 3, pp. 1467–1479, Mar. 2016.
  29. H. Abosh, Z. Q. Zhu, and Y. Ren, “Reduction of torque an flux ripples in Space Vector Modulation-based Direct Torque Control of asmmetric Permanent Magnet Synchronous Machine,” IEEE Trans. Power Electron., vol. 32, no. 4, pp. 2976–2986, Apr. 2017.
  30. Vinod B. R., R. Baiju, and Shiny G., “Five level inverter fed space vector based direct torue control of open-end winding induction motor drive,” IEEE Trans. Energy Convers., Mar. 2018, accepted for publication.

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15.

Authors:

Meera Gandhi, Keshireddy Vishruth Reddy, Kota Hemanth

Paper Title:

GIS Enabled Black Box System for Accident Alerts

Abstract: The proposed black box system is used to send an alert message to the registered mobile numbers whenever an accident occurs. Black box is connected to various sensors to detect any errors in the vehicle. Due to the presence of GIS feature, the location of the vehicle is also sent to the registered mobile numbers. The black box system also sends an alert message to the nearest hospital. All the sensors are connected to arduino chip. 

Keywords: GIS Feature, Mobile Numbers, Black Box System

References:

  1. JINMING YOUL, JUNHUA WANG1, JINGQIU GUO1(2017) “REAL-TIME CRASH PREDICTION ON FREEWAYS USING DATA MINING AND EMERGING TECHNIQUES” JOURNAL ON SPRINGER, VOL 25, ISSUE 2, PP 116–123
  2. Esko Turunen(2017) “Using GUHA Data Mining Method in Analyzing Road Traffic Accidents Occurred in the Years 2004–2008 in Finland” ” journal on springer, Vol 2, Issue 3, pp 224–231
  3. Parveen Sultana H1, Senthil Jayavel2 Mudit Saraf3 and Saket Maskara(2017) “SMART VEHICLE COLLISION DETECTION AND SOS SERVICE” ” journal on aladpubl,  Vol 116, issue 12 , pp 137-
  4. SANJAY MOHAPATRA(2016), ” REMOTE SENSING AND GIS” ” journal on csi communications, Vol 40, Issue  9,pp 1-52
  5. Elsevier B.V(2016),” GIS TOOLS FOR ANALYZING ACCIDENTS AND ROAD DESIGN” precedings on sciencedirect conference” journal on science direct,   Vol 18 Pp 242-247
  6. Sahar Alian, R.G.V. Baker, Stephen Wood(2016) “Rural casualty crashes on the Kings Highway: A new approach for road safety studies” ” journal on sciencedirect, vol 95 part A, Pp 8-19
  7. Lei Lin, Qian Wang, and Adel W. Sadek(2014) “Data Mining and Complex Network Algorithms for Traffic Accident Analysis” journal on  trrjournal,   vol 2460, pp 5-11
  8. c and wagstaff(2014) “ MACHINE LEARNING FOR SCIENCE AND SOCIETY” ” journal on  springer, Vol 95, ISSUE 1, pp 1–9
  9. Eunbi jeong, cheol oh, ikki kim(2013) “detection of lateral hazardous driving events using in-vehicle gyro sensor data” ” journal on springer, vol 17, issue 6, pp 1471–1479
  10. byung yun lee, yong yoon shin, hyun joo bae, " development of insurance server system based on vehicle driving information ", proceedings of 7th ieee international conference on computing and convergence technology (iccct), 2012, pp. 156-159
  11. Rune Elvik(2012) “Risk of road accident associated with the use of drugs: A systematic review and meta-analysis of evidence from epidemiological studies” journal on Elsevier, Vol 60, Pp  254-267
  12. Sung-Hyun Baek, Hwa-Sun Kim, Da-WoonJeong, Mi-Jin Kim, You-Sin Park, Jong-Wook Jang, (2011) "Implementation Vehicle Driving State System with OBD-II, MOST network", Proceedings of the 17th Asia-Pacific Conference on Communications (APCC), pp. 709-714
  13. GAETANO VALENTI & MARIA LELLI & DOMENICO CUCINA(2010) “A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF MODELS FOR THE INCIDENT DURATION PREDICTION” ” JOURNAL ON SPRINGER,  VOL 2, ISSUE 2, PP 103–111
  14. Abdallah Kassem, RabihJabr, GhadySalamouni, ZiadKhairallahMaalouf, "Vehicle Black Box System", Proceedings of the 2nd Annual IEEE System Conference, IEEE 2008
  15. Mohamedaslam, Mohamed Sahal M.T. and Ajmal Roshan T.(2017) " A smart vehicle for accident prevention using wireless blackbox and eyeblink sensing technology along with seat belt controlled ignition system" proceedings of IEEE international conference on isbn information S Reeja, V S Jayaraj, "An embedded based approaches for accident analysis using event data recorder", Electrical Instrumentation and Communication Engineering (ICEICE) 2017 IEEE International Conference on, pp. 1-5, 2017.
  16. Rekha, B. S. Hithaishi,(2017) "Car Surveillance and Driver Assistance Using Black box with the Help of GSM and GPS Technology" proceedings of IEEE international conference, Pp 297 – 301
  17. Ahmed Aliyu; jonathan.g.kolo, olaniyi o.mikail(2017) " ultrasonic sensor distance induced automobile collision avoidence system" proceedings on IEEE international conference on electrotechnology , pp 354-358
  18. jae jun yoo, dyhum kim, jonghugn park(2008) "disign implementation of magnetic sensor network for detecting automobiles" proceeedings of IEEE local network conference Soundarraj.V , Rajasekar.L (2013) " Design of Car Black Box Based on ARM" journal on ijett journal,  Vol-1, No-2  Page 33.

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16.

Authors:

Ayoob Khan T. E, Shahna M, Shahul Hameed T. A.

Paper Title:

Performance Comparison of JL FinFETs with Variability in Fin Structure and Shape 

Abstract: To avoid the scaling challenges of CMOS the Junctionless transistors (JLT) has recently been proposed. Unlike conventional transistors, JLT have no junctions i.e source/drain /channel regions are uniformly doped with same species and that is the main advantage of JLT. In this study, the impact of work function variation(WFV), spacer dielectric, material engineering on the performance of conventional P channel Junctionless FinFET is analyzed. Trapezoidal and Multifin structures of JL FinFETs are proposed and same impact is considered under similar conditions at supply voltage -0.9 V. All studies are carried out using Silvaco Atlas TCAD tool. The basic performance parameters under consideration are off current ,VTH, SS & ION/IOFF ratio and observed characteristics fluctuations on the devices. The proposed architecture shows better short channel characteristics and also provides better ION/IOFF ratio compared to conventional JL FinFET.

Keywords: JL FinFET, Spacer Dielectric, Sub threshold Slope, Work Function Variation

References:

  1. Jean-Pierre Colinge et. al. “Nanowire transistors without junctions,” Nature Nanotechnology 5(3):225-9, February 2010.
  2. S K Masum Nawaz et al, “Effects of Device Scaling on the Performance ofJunctionless FinFETs Due to GateMetal WorkFunction Variability and Random Dopant Fluctuations,” IEEE Electron Device Letters, Vol. 37, No. 8 ,2016.
  3. Bharathi et. al, “Performance Optimization of Bulk Junction less FinFETs through Work Function Engineering,” International Conference on Circuit, Power and Computing Technologies, March 2014.
  4. A B Sachid, “Sub 20nm gate length FinFET design,” IEDM Tech. Dig., pp. 697–700,2008.
  5. S Gundapaneni, “ Enhanced electrostatic integrity of short channel junction less transistor with high k spacers,” IEEE Electron Device Lett., vol. no. 10, pp. 1325–1327,2011.
  6. Dilsukh Nehra, “High Permittivity Spacer Effects on Junctionless FinFET based Circuit/SRAM Applications,” 2014.

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17.

Authors:

Sheeba Jeba Malar J, Jayaraju M.

Paper Title:

Power Quality Analysis of Hybrid AC/DC Microgrid in Distribution Network

Abstract: Microgrid is a complex structure which is a localized group of electricity generation, storage and load which usually operates connected to a macrogrid. The quality of power delivered to the grid during interconnection is one of the key factors which determine the reliability of the microgrid and is affected due to various reasons which include electronic components that leads to equipment overheating, excessive neutral currents etc., which can cause voltage dip, flicker and unbalance voltage at the end user. The power quality level in microgrid has to be quantized and necessary analysis has to be done to investigate the power quality impact in microgrid network. In this paper the analysis of THD of the hybrid system with PV and DFIG in grid connected and islanded mode is studied using MATLAB/SIMULINK. It is found that the THD is reduced when both PV and wind are connected to the grid and increases when isolated. The major advantage of this analysis emphasizes that this system can be applied for highly nonlinear and variable PV and wind systems connected together with the grid. Simulation results also shows that this system is effective for microgrid with varying inputs.

Keywords: Microgrid, Power Quality, Grid Connected, Isolated, Photovoltaic Array, DFIG

References:

  1. EI-Samahy, EI-Saadany,”The Effect of DG on power Quality in a Deregulated Environment,” in IEEE power Engineering Society General Meeting 2005, pp.2969-2976.
  2. D.Hendrson, P.J.Rose,”Harmonics: The Effects on Power Quality And Transformers”, IEEE Trans Industry Apply, 1994, vol (3), pp528-532
  3. M Halpin, L.L.Grigsby the Electric Power Engineering Handbook, CRC LLC (2001), PP15.22-23
  4. IEEE 1547,IEEE Standard for Interconnecting Distributed Resources with Electric power systems,2003,pp8-10
  5. Poitiers, M. Machmoum, R. Le Doeuff and M.E. Zaim, “Control of a doubly-fed induction generator for wind energy conversion systems,” IEEE Trans .Renewable Energy, Vol. 3, N°. 3, pp.373-378, December 2001.
  6. Baggini A B, “Hand Book of power quality”, Wiley online library , 2008, http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/9780470754245
  7. Francisco De La Rosa, “ Harmonics and Power Systems” CRC press, Boca Raton, 2006.
  8. Abdulrahman Kalbat, “PSCAD Simulation of Grid-Tied Photovoltaic Systems and Total Harmonic Distortion Analysis” International Conference on Electric Power and Energy conversion systems, October 2013
  9. IEEE Recommended Practices and Requirements for Harmonic Control in Electrical Power Systems, IEEE Std. 519, 1992.
  10. M. Bagi, N. Jayakumar, Thiruvonasundari. D, “Performance analysis of power flow controller for photovoltaic generation system using MATLAB/SIMULINK,” International Journal of Engineering Research and Technology, Vol. 3 , Issue.3, March 2014, pp.2113 – 2119.
  11. Jiao,B.-TeckOoi,G.Joos,andF.Zhou,“Doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG) as a hybrid of asynchronous and synchronous machines, “Electric Power Systems Research,76,33–37,July 2005.
  12. Chowdhury, Badrul H; Chellapilla, Srinivas , “Double-fed induction generator control for variable speed wind power generation,” Electric Power Systems Research, Vol 76, issue 9, 786–800, 2006.
  13. Eel-Hwan, S.-B. Oh, Y.-H. Kim, and C.-S. Kim, “Power control of a doubly fed induction machine without rotational transducers,” Proceedings of the Power Electronics and Motion Control Conference, Vol. 2, pp. 951–955, August 2000.
  14. Andreas Peterson, Lennart Harnefors, and Torbjorn Thiringer, “Evaluation of current control methods for wind turbines using doubly fed induction machines”, IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics, vol.20, No.1,January 2005.
  15. Pena, J. Clare, and G. Asher, “Doubly fed induction generator using back-to-back PWM converters and its application to variable-speed wind-energy generation,” IEE Proceedings on Electric Power Applications, vol 143, pp.231–241, May 1996.
  16. Sebastian R. “Modelling and simulation of a high penetration wind diesel system with battery energy storage” International Journal of Electric Power Energy System 2011;33(3):767–74.

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18.

Authors:

Mahmoud A. Farrag, Khaled A. El-Araby, Hassan A. Mahdy, Khaled A. Kandil

Paper Title:

Development of Speed Prediction Models for Day-time Versus Night-time Conditions on Rural Multilane Egyptian Highways

Abstract: This study presents the development of operating speed models for day-time and night-time conditions for highways in Egypt based on a study of 58 horizontal curves at different sites on rural multilane roads. In each horizontal curve, spot speeds at each horizontal curve and tangents between them were collected during the day and night at five points. Spot speeds were collected at the middle of first tangent, point of curve, middle of curve, point of tangent and the middle of second tangent. In the operating speed models, the radius of the horizontal curve was used to estimate the operating speed. The speed models determined that the operating speed correlated with the radius of the horizontal curve. Statistical tests were used to compare daytime and nighttime speeds at the midpoint of each horizontal curve. The comparison reveals that there is no statistical difference between daytime and nighttime speeds at the midpoint of the horizontal curves. Another test was done to investigate the design consistency of the horizontal curves. Comparison between speeds at the main points of the horizontal curve was made. Differences between speeds at point of curve, middle of curve and point of tangent were examined within the tested horizontal curves using ANOVA. The results of ANOVA test for horizontal curves in each group showed that there is no significant difference in speeds between each two successive points within the horizontal curve.

Keywords: Operating Speed, Design Consistency, Regression Analysis, Daytime & Night-Time Speeds. 

References:

  1. Richard J. Porter, (2014), “Operational and Safety Effects of Geometrics at Night.”, AHB65_3_2014_Call_for_Papers_Porter.
  2. Varghese, C., & Shankar, U. (2007), “Passenger Vehicle Occupant Fatalities by Day and Night- A ” Traffic Safety Facts: Research Note. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.
  3. Ridwan B.A Quaiam, G. Hawkins, P. Carlson, T. Lomax, Y. Zhang, (2010), “A Comparison of Vehicle Speed at Day and Night at Rural Horizontal Curves.”.
  4. McShane, (2004), “Traffic Engineering”.
  5. HCM, (2000), “Highway Capacity Manual”.
  6. Hatem Mahmoud, (2015), “Three-Dimensional Modelling of Operating Speeds on Horizontal Curves for Two-Lane Rural Highways.” Transportation Research Board, Washington, D. C.
  7. Transportation Research Circular: Number E-C151 (2011)

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19.

Authors:

Muhammad Abdus Samad, Chowdhury Luthfur Rahman, Md. Toufiqur Rahman, Md. Shafiqul Islam, Prodip Sarkar

Paper Title:

Measurement & Analysis of Productivity and Finding Solutions to Improve Productivity in a Garment Factory in Bangladesh

Abstract: RMG is the biggest manufacturing sector in Bangladesh, which contributes biggest part in the growth rate of GDP. Though, this sector has some obstacles to overcome for greater outcomes. To ensure sustainable economic growth and compete in the global market, the garment industries should utilize their resources properly. Higher productivity ensures higher utilization of available resources i.e. man power, raw materials etc. In this paper we have studied and analyzed the productivity in sewing section of a garment factory. The focus of the study was labor productivity and defects in the production floor. Labor productivity was measured and analyzed using Kurosawa’s structural approach. It was found that the labor productivity is not up to the standard level. The reasons that reduce labor productivity and the factors for improving labor productivity were identified using questionnaires and observations. Occurrence of defects was analyzed using Pareto analysis which helped to identify the vital defects. Using root cause analysis, cause and effect diagram was generated and the reasons of the defects were identified. Based on that, the solutions for reducing those defects were recommended. Some of the techniques that the garment manufacturing factory can implement are six sigma, automation and nominal group technique.

Keywords: Kurosawa Approach, Pareto Analysis, Labor Productivity, Root Cause Analysis, Cause and Effect Diagram.

References:

  1. Akter, A. (2017). An overview of Bangladesh RMG 2016, Retrieved 6th June, 2017, from https://www.textiletoday.com.bd/overview-bangladesh-rmg-2016/
  2. (2017). Trade Information. Business and Trade, Retrieved 5th June, 2017, from http://www.bgmea.com.bd/home/pages/tradeinformation
  3. Research, T. T. (2017). Bangladesh RMG competencies in global market is diminishing, Retrieved 16th June, 2017, from https://www.textiletoday.com.bd/bangladesh-rmg-competencies-global-market-diminishing/
  4. Kurosawa, K. (1980). Structural approach to the concept and measurement of productivity. Keizai Shushi 50(2), 96-135.
  5. Duran, C., Cetindere, A., &Aksu, Y. E. (2015). Productivity Improvement by Work and Time Study Technique for Earth Energy-glass Manufacturing Company. Procedia Economics and Finance, 26(Supplement C), 109-113. doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/S2212-5671(15)00887-4
  6. Petreanu, V., Iordache, R., &Seracin, M. (2013). Assessment of Work Stress Influence on Work Productivity in Romanian Companies. Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences, 92(Supplement C), 420-425. doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sbspro.2013.08.695
  7. Loera, I., Espinosa, G., Enríquez, C., & Rodriguez, J. (2013). Productivity in Construction and Industrial Maintenance. Procedia Engineering, 63(Supplement C), 947-955. doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.proeng.2013.08.274

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20.

Authors:

Nihar Ranjan Panda, Akash Kumar Gupta

Paper Title:

A Study on Low Power Wide Area Network Technologies for Internet of Things

Abstract: LPWAN is used when other networks are not good fit like Wi-Fi, Zig bee, Bluetooth, because these networks are not suited for long-range applications as they consume lots of power and service, and hardware is also expensive. Hence LPWAN is suited for sending fewer amounts of data over long range keeping longer battery life. LPWAN is used in IOT because some of IOT applications require only fewer amounts of information data to be transmitted .eg parking garage sensor. In LPWAN, the end nodes can be placed even 10 km away from the gateway. Depending on IoT technology LPWAN data to be sent several times of a day and of data rate is 5000 bits per second.

Keywords: LPWAN; IOT, Zig-Bee, M2M, Range, Gain(dB)

References:

  1. https://www.wikipedia.org/
  2. https://www.sigfox.com/en
  3. https://www.link-labs.com/An evaluation of low power wide area network technologies for the Internet of Things, Keith E. Nolan, Wael Guibene, Mark Y. Kelly 
  4. internetofthingsagenda.techtarget.com
  5. Atzori A. Iera G. Morabito "The Internet of Things: A survey" Computer Networks vol. 54 no. 15 pp. 2787-2805 2010. 
  6. http://internetofthingsagenda.techtarget.com/definition/LPWAN-low-power-wide-area-network

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21.

Authors:

Amit Vashisth, Ravinder Kumar

Paper Title:

Review on Effect of Pavement Characteristics on Fuel Consumption

Abstract: Effect of pavement on vehicle fuel consumption in the literature represents the interest of the engineering community in making pavements, more fuel efficient through which sustainability could be maintained in the environment. The literature reviewed in this article covered the effect of pavement characteristics such as Smoothness, Texture, and type of pavement on rolling resistance. Methods used by the authors in the previous studies includes literature review, Field experiments, Lab experiments and modeling and the scopes of the studies extended from smoothness and texture to pavement characteristics. Existing literature establish a relationship between pavement properties and fuel economy. Smoothness and texture affect the rolling resistance most, the effect of smoothness is positive and that of texture is negative. But in most of the studies the effect of structural property such as stiffness or pavement type does not provide a significant difference in fuel consumption between flexible and rigid pavement and require more rigorous work in the area. 

Keywords: Texture; Smoothness; Pavement; Fuel Economy; Rolling Resistance; Sustainability.

References:

  1. Abdo, J. (2005). Béton et développement durable: Analyse du cycle de vie des structures routières (French Report: Concrete and Sustainable Development: Analysis of the Life Cycle of Road Structures). Report No. T89. Centre d’Information sur le Ciment et ses Applications (CIMbéton), Le Défense, France.
  2. Amos, D., 2006. Pavement smoothness and fuel efficiency: an analysis of the economic dimensions of the Missouri Smooth Road Initiative(No. OR07-005).
  3. Akbarian, M. and F. Ulm. (2012). Model Based Pavement-Vehicle Interaction Simulation for Life Cycle Assessment of Pavements. Master of Science thesis. Concrete Sustainability Hub, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA.
  4. Benbow, E., Iaquinta, J., Lodge, R., and Wright, A., 2007. An Investigation of the effects of pavement stiffness on fuel consumption.Transport Research Laboratory Limited: Berkshire, UK.
  5. Baumgart, F., 2000. Stiffness-an unknown world of mechanical science?.Injury-International Journal for the Care of the Injured, 31(2), pp.14-23.
  6. Bester, C.J., 1984.Effect of pavement type and condition on the fuel consumption of vehicles (No. HS-039 023).
  7. Beuving, E., T. De Jonghe, D. Goos, T. Lindahl, & A. Stawiarski (2004). Environmental Impacts and Fuel Efficiency of Road Pavements. European Roads Review, No. 2.
  8. Cenek, P.D., 1994. Rolling Resistance Characteristics of New Zealand Road Surfaces. InVehicle-Road Interaction. ASTM International.
  9. Cimbéton (2007). Béton et développement durable: Analyse du cycle de vie des structures routières (French Report: Concrete and Sustainable Development: Analysis of the Life Cycle of Road Structures). Routes, No. 101, pp. 6–13.
  10. De Graaff, D.F. (1999). Rolweerstand van ZOAB – een pilotstudie (Dutch Report: Rolling Resistance of Porous Asphalt — A Pilot Study). Report No. M+P.MVM.97.2.1, rev. 2, M+P, Vught, Netherlands.
  11. Delanne, Y., 1994. The influence of pavement evenness and macrotexture on fuel consumption. InVehicle-road interaction. ASTM International.
  12. Deraad, L.W., 1978. The influence of road surface texture on tire rolling resistance(No. 780257). SAE Technical Paper.
  13. Descornet, G., 1990. Road-surface influence on tire rolling resistance. InSurface characteristics of roadways: international research and technologies. ASTM International.
  14. Du Plessis, H.W., Visser, A.T., and Curtayne, P.C., 1990. Fuel consumption of vehicles as affected by road-surface characteristics. InSurface Characteristics of Roadways: International Research and Technologies. ASTM International.
  15. Greene, S., Akbarian, M., Ulm, F.J. and Gregory, J., 2013. Pavement Roughness and Fuel Consumption.Concrete Sustainability Hub, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
  16. Heffernan, M. (2006). NCAT Fuel Economy Research Overview. Master of Science thesis. Auburn University, Auburn, AL.
  17. Hultqvist, B.A., 2010. Measurements of fuel consumption on an asphalt pavement and a concrete pavement in Sweden. In11th International Symposium on Concrete Roads, Seville, Spain.
  18. Jackson, Mike, and James Fletcher (2005). Fuel Consumption Vs. Pavement Smoothness, Final Report.The University of North Florida.
  19. Jiao, X., 2013. Comparison of Fuel Consumption on Rigid Versus Flexible Pavements Along I-95 In Florida.
  20. Köppen, S. (2009). ISO 28580: Passenger Car, Truck and Bus Tyres — Method of measuring rolling resistance — Single point test and correlation of measurement results. Working Paper No. STD-01-05, 1st informal meeting, Joint GRB/GRRF Informal Group on Special Tyre Definitions (STD), United Nations Economic Commission for Europe, Geneva, Switzerland.
  21. Laganier, R. And Lucas, J., 1990. The influence of pavement evenness and macrotexture on fuel consumption. InSurface characteristics of roadways: International research and technologies. ASTM International.
  22. Lindahl, T. And Goos, D., 2002. Environmental aspects of asphalt and concrete roads.Nynas Bitumen, Stockholm, Sweden.
  23. Lu, X.P. (1985). Effects of Road Roughness on Vehicular Rolling Resistance. In Measuring Road Roughness and Its Effects on User Cost and Comfort. ASTM STP 884. T.D. Gillespie & M. Sayers (eds.). American Society for Testing and Materials, Philadelphia, PA. Pp. 143–161.
  24. Mckeown, A., (2002). Influence of pavement construction on vehicle fuel economy.PR/IP/021/02. TRL Limited.
  25. Michelin.2003The Tyre EncyclopediaVol3Michelin
  26. National Research Council (US). Transportation Research Board. Committee for the National Tire Efficiency Study, 2006.Tires and passenger vehicle fuel economy: informing consumers, improving performance(Vol. 286). Transportation Research Board.
  27. Newcomb, D. And Marks, P.H., (2009). Smoothness Still Matters.
  28. Nielsen, 2014. All India Study on Sectoral Demand of Diesel & Petrol, Petroleum Planning and Analysis Cell (PPAC) of Petroleum Ministry.
  29. NPC (2002). VEROAD® Calculations: Maximum Energy Dissipation when Driving on Asphalt Pavement Versus Driving on Rigid Cement Concrete. Netherlands Pavement Consultants. Utrecht, Netherlands.
  30. OECD (1984). Road Surface Characteristics: Their Interaction and their Optimization, in Road Transport Research, Organization for Economic Co-operation and development.
  31. Perriot, A., 2008. Roads and Energy: How Pavements can Affect Vehicle Fuel Consumption.Colas Group, Boulogne-Billancourt, France.
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22.

Authors:

Farzana Khatoon, Barkatullah

Paper Title:

Performance of Under Water Optical Wireless Communication System

Abstract: This article belongs to under water optical system specially used to link costal vehicles. the sensor network wireless communication play an important role in under water optical communication. It also monitoring biological, biogeochemical, evolutionary, and ecological changes in the sea, ocean, and lake environments, and in helping to control and maintain oil production facilities and harbors using unmanned underwater vehicles, submarines, ships, buoys, and divers. The properties of light travel through the water changes. One of the main targets in UOWC channel modeling is to evaluate the overall path loss which is essential for calculating link budgets and signal-to-noise ratio. we propose a fast numerical solution for the steady state radiative transfer equation in order to calculate the path loss due to light absorption and scattering in various type of underwater channels.

Keywords: Underwater Optical Communication (UWOC), Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE).

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